The Privilege of Music

When I reflect back on my life experiences and think of some of my biggest joys and most devastating heartbreaks, I remember turning to one thing to celebrate, and at times immerse myself in grief. Music.

Music is an intrinsic part of all of us. The range of emotions that can be found in a song help us process our feelings. Rhythm and pulse can be found in our heartbeat, and our breathing and movement. Melody is created in our laughing, crying, screaming, or singing. Our feelings can be processed and held within the rhythms and harmonies of different musical styles. These intimate connections with music remain despite our abilities intellectually or physically, and are not dependent on musical training.

Because of this, it makes sense that music therapy would offer numerous opportunities to teach children an array of things. As babies, when Sienna or Haley were upset or struggled to communicate their feelings, I turned to music. It has been the number one tool in my parenting kit.

As Sienna evolved in her therapeutic needs, I realized that I should be capitalizing on her love of music. When she is struggling to grasp a concept, I find a way to make it into a song and inevitably, she grasps the concept over time. She pays more attention. She smiles and listens. It garners her focus. For this reason, I chose to start weekly music therapy, despite the fact that our insurance carrier and Medicaid do not see the value in it. We pay out of pocket for a therapist to come to our home on a weekly basis. We started these sessions in March. Since then, Sienna’s vocabulary has expanded. The clarity of her speech has been enhanced. She is starting to understand colors. She is picking up various objects and turning them into musical instruments. I can understand every word she says while singing.

Music therapists can use music to help with a wide variety of needs ranging from learning difficulties, mental illness, abuse, stress, or illness. Music therapy can support the development of children in many ways. Music, in all its forms, can provide expression and pleasure at all ages. There is a great opportunity to use music in a planned way to help children and adults to improve their spoken language.

 

Yet, most insurance companies will not approve it. Our federal government aims to take services away from our children, when truly we should be adding services. Medicaid is on the verge of change. It’s looming. Every day, I wake up terrified of what the news will say about the programs my daughter utilizes. I watch her grow developmentally, with the aid of her services. When she is an adult, she will be a valuable member of society. She will contribute and I will make sure of that. I will fight and advocate to get her everything she needs, but I need your help. I need to spread this message to our senators, congressmen and women, and our political leaders.It benefits us all to give children the services they need now, so that they won’t be dependent on the government as they mature. I hope that this is something we can all agree on, regardless of political affiliations. Children are our future, and they should be given the resources they need. I realize that I come from a place of privilege and that is the reason that Sienna is succeeding. Not all families are that lucky.

For local families interested, we currently work with Allison Broaddrick of Three Rivers Music Therapy. She is a fantastic resource. If you are interested in learning more about what she offers, reach out to me and I will share her contact information with you.

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