The Privilege of Music

When I reflect back on my life experiences and think of some of my biggest joys and most devastating heartbreaks, I remember turning to one thing to celebrate, and at times immerse myself in grief. Music.

Music is an intrinsic part of all of us. The range of emotions that can be found in a song help us process our feelings. Rhythm and pulse can be found in our heartbeat, and our breathing and movement. Melody is created in our laughing, crying, screaming, or singing. Our feelings can be processed and held within the rhythms and harmonies of different musical styles. These intimate connections with music remain despite our abilities intellectually or physically, and are not dependent on musical training.

Because of this, it makes sense that music therapy would offer numerous opportunities to teach children an array of things. As babies, when Sienna or Haley were upset or struggled to communicate their feelings, I turned to music. It has been the number one tool in my parenting kit.

As Sienna evolved in her therapeutic needs, I realized that I should be capitalizing on her love of music. When she is struggling to grasp a concept, I find a way to make it into a song and inevitably, she grasps the concept over time. She pays more attention. She smiles and listens. It garners her focus. For this reason, I chose to start weekly music therapy, despite the fact that our insurance carrier and Medicaid do not see the value in it. We pay out of pocket for a therapist to come to our home on a weekly basis. We started these sessions in March. Since then, Sienna’s vocabulary has expanded. The clarity of her speech has been enhanced. She is starting to understand colors. She is picking up various objects and turning them into musical instruments. I can understand every word she says while singing.

Music therapists can use music to help with a wide variety of needs ranging from learning difficulties, mental illness, abuse, stress, or illness. Music therapy can support the development of children in many ways. Music, in all its forms, can provide expression and pleasure at all ages. There is a great opportunity to use music in a planned way to help children and adults to improve their spoken language.

 

Yet, most insurance companies will not approve it. Our federal government aims to take services away from our children, when truly we should be adding services. Medicaid is on the verge of change. It’s looming. Every day, I wake up terrified of what the news will say about the programs my daughter utilizes. I watch her grow developmentally, with the aid of her services. When she is an adult, she will be a valuable member of society. She will contribute and I will make sure of that. I will fight and advocate to get her everything she needs, but I need your help. I need to spread this message to our senators, congressmen and women, and our political leaders.It benefits us all to give children the services they need now, so that they won’t be dependent on the government as they mature. I hope that this is something we can all agree on, regardless of political affiliations. Children are our future, and they should be given the resources they need. I realize that I come from a place of privilege and that is the reason that Sienna is succeeding. Not all families are that lucky.

For local families interested, we currently work with Allison Broaddrick of Three Rivers Music Therapy. She is a fantastic resource. If you are interested in learning more about what she offers, reach out to me and I will share her contact information with you.

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The Road less Traveled; Things I Wish I’d Known About Having a Child with Down Syndrome

I remember my first World Down Syndrome Day like it was yesterday. I remember scrolling through my Facebook page wondering how all these families were so happy to have children with Down syndrome. I wasn’t there yet. I put on the silly socks. I faked my smile. I posted on social media. I went home and cried. I cried for the joy that I couldn’t find in this road less traveled. Today, is our third WDSD, and I want to tell the families out there that aren’t celebrating, that it’s okay. These are the things I wish I had known.

I wish I had realized that the doctor who delivered your diagnosis did not understand the beauty of raising a child with Down syndrome. I wish I wouldn’t have let the harshness of his words affect me in such a profound way. I wish I had known that the picture he was painting was with his brush, not ours. Where he saw different, I see wonderment. Where he saw delays, I see triumphs. Where he saw pain, I see love. Where he saw hardship, I see fulfillment. When he saw only your diagnosis and not the person you are, I saw a need for change.

I wish I had realized that sometimes a happy ending isn’t the way you pictured it, but that doesn’t mean you can’t find inspiration in what’s different. Sometimes the happy ending is even better than the one you dreamt up in your head. Sometimes the storms in our lives make us better people, and they give us an appreciation for all the things that other people take for granted. That kind of perspective is a rare gift.

Before you arrived, our life was chaotic and fast. You have forced us to slow down, and appreciate the beauty that comes from the road less traveled. I will never forget the pain I felt when you were born, but overcoming that hardship and celebrating the person you are, has added color to our world and fulfillment to our souls. The proverbial fork in the road doesn’t always have two choices. Sometimes, you build your own path.

I wish I had realized the meaning you would add to my life. Advocating for you has been one of our greatest blessings. Teaching others about how wonderful our lives are with you in it, fulfills me in a way I never imagined possible, in a way only other mothers on this journey can understand. I didn’t know that I would feel more at home in this community than I ever have. The friendships, the compassion, and understanding that live in this world are gifts that I treasure.

The girls and me teaching a first grade class about Down syndrome
Our friends at this year’s Buddy Walk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Your presence in your sister’s life is a blessing, not a curse. I wish I had known that having you as her sibling would make her even more kind and empathetic. I wish I had known that she would gravitate towards protecting you, all on her own, without me pushing. I wish I would have realized that sharing the spotlight with you would make her happy, not resentful. I wish I had been given a crystal ball saw that I could picture the smiles, the laughter, and the love that exists between the two of you. I wish I had realized that adults that have siblings with Down syndrome are grateful.

I wish I had realized the battles that still need to be fought for you and your peers. Before you arrived, I thought that every child in this country was provided with the therapies and assistance they needed to thrive. I didn’t realize that families had to fight for services, education, and assistance. I didn’t realize that adults with Down syndrome were lobbying for their rights. You have opened my eyes to the work that needs to be done to help others.

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We Walk the Line

There is a line that exists, and all mothers of children with special needs walk it. It is not my favorite part of this journey. Advocacy versus inclusion. It’s a push and pull, an ever going battle in my mind. It’s the uncertainty that is parenthood. We never know if we are doing the right thing, but we forge ahead.

The push is the piece that wills me to discuss advocacy, to prove to society that Sienna has worth and that Down syndrome has a place in this world. I want people to know that Down syndrome is nothing like I thought. It’s a gift, a blessing, it’s Sienna.

Then, there’s the pull, constantly telling me to treat her the same as her typically developing peers. Place no limitations on her, and treat her as you would treat any other child. If you baby her, she will not succeed. If you draw attention to her diagnosis, you are doing her a disservice.

So, which is it?

When you write a blog and post as often as I do on social media, one thing is certain. Opinions are abundant.

“If you want Sienna to be treated like everyone else, why do you constantly draw attention to Down syndrome?”

“You don’t have to defend her, you know. She’s just a baby.”

“Don’t you think advocacy has taken over your life? Is that really what’s best for Sienna? For Haley? For your marriage?”

These are actual quotes from people in my life whom I love. They all want what’s best for me, for my family, and my children. If they question it, do you know how many times a day I question it? Constantly.

I am in the midst of a WDSD school tour teaching children about Down syndrome, carting Sienna along with me to show children that God creates beauty in all of us, that we all have unique talents and challenges. I am drawing attention to her.

The reality is this. Down syndrome is here to stay. I am not ashamed of it. Yes, it is a big part of our lives. I have a tattoo on my arm that signifies how proud I am of my daughter and our family, so obviously, I am in it for life. Sienna’s diagnosis is written on her face, and it will be for the rest of her life. Sometimes, I am relieved that her face reveals her challenges. I see mothers with children on the spectrum. How do they explain that their child is not misbehaving, without pointing out their diagnosis? It’s a constant battle.

Motherhood is insecurity at all times. You make decisions on behalf of these tiny, incapable, humans. You hope that you are doing the right thing, but you don’t get to see the future. If you screw up, their happiness and place in this world are at risk, and all of that lands on you. It’s pressure. It’s stress. It’s hardship. It’s also beauty, fulfillment, and reward. All of these feelings coexist in my world, at this moment in time.

The truth is, I have no idea if I am doing the right thing. Does anyone? Aren’t we all just faking it? All I know is that it feels right. It feels right to visit schools and share Sienna. It feels right to use my voice to tell society how much color Sienna brings to our world. It feels right to talk about Down syndrome and her challenges, because they are my challenges too. I might change my mind some day. I reserve that right. For now, this is where we are.

If you don’t use your voice to tell your story, will anyone ever hear it? Will anyone ever learn from it? Your story is who you are, and our story is Down syndrome. Our story is girl power. Our story is miscarriages and infertility. Our story is heartbreak, adventure, and redemption. Thank you for reading about this life we got. You make this mom feel like she is doing something worthwhile.

 

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